This Weekend’s VOD Favorites

The Gay Cinema Video On Demand experience at TLAgay.com has your entertainment needs covered! We’re always working to expand selection of new and old gay-themed movies available for your viewing pleasure. Here’s just five of our current favorites that you may have missed – ALL available to watch INSTANTLY! Stay home, stay safe and enjoy a movie!

 

Nowhere
Adrian and Sebastian (Miguel González and Juan Pablo Castiblanco) live an openly gay life in New York as immigrants. When Sebastian’s visa is rejected, the two must decide whether to return to Colombia – where they face rejection and persecution for their sexual orientation – or do whatever is necessary to stay in the United States. Either way, the thoughts and discussions associated with the decision will have a profound effect on the couple. Hitting upon hot button issues, Nowhere is a riveting new romantic drama that places its characters within the context of the difficult immigration situation in the US – as well as a furthering sense of homelessness and lack of belonging, which consistently haunts out main protagonists.

 

The Harvesters
In this stirring debut, Greek-African filmmaker Etienne Kallos explores repressed sexuality, religion and masculinity in the deep South African countryside. Two teenage boys start a dangerous fight for power, heritage and parental love that will change both of their lives forever. Religion and field work are the guiding principles of their conservative farming community, where strength and masculinity are valued above all else. In this repressive environment, young Janno (Brent Vermeulen) keeps his feelings to himself. One day his mother brings home Pieter (Alex van Dyk), a hardened street orphan she wants to save, and asks Janno to treat this stranger as his new brother. The trouble is: Pieter does not want to be saved.

 

Greta
70-year-old nurse Pedro (Marco Nanini) needs to find a hospital bed for his friend Daniela (Denise Weinberg). In an effort to free up space, he secretly takes a wounded young man (Demick Lopes) into his home. In spite of the young man’s troubled past, a tender, physical relationship develops between the caring Pedro, and Jean, his convalescent houseguest. Though Jean refers to him as “my old cocksucker,” the young man’s true intentions are hard to discern. This affectionate and dignified cinematic debut tells a tale of friendship, love, sex and age. Surrounded as he is by sickness, death and other disasters on a daily basis, Pedro is possessed of the kind of strength of character that means he is not easily fazed. Not even when he makes a surprising discovery about his new, much younger lover.

 

You’ll Never Be Alone
Introverted Juan (Sergio Hernández), manager of a mannequin factory, lives alone with his eighteen-year-old gay son, Pablo (Andrew Bargsted). Whilst Pablo blithely studies dance, Juan is hoping that, after twenty-five years at the firm, his boss will consider him for a partnership. When Pablo is badly wounded in a brutal homophobic attack, which sees him hospitalized, his father realizes just how far they have become estranged. A lack of witnesses and expensive medical bills force Juan to leave the quiet stability of his life for good and reposition himself in a world where there is discrimination. Time and again, his efforts amount to nothing… until one night on the streets of Santiago when he decides to start making up his own rules in order to save his son.

 

Malila: The Farewell Flower
Former lovers Shane and Pitch (Sukollawat Kanarot and Anuchit Sapanpong) reunite after years apart and try to heal the wounds of their past. Shane is haunted by the tragic death of his daughter, while Pitch suffers a grave illness, rejecting medical treatment as painful and ineffective. A talented artist, Pitch creates beautiful structures made out of flowers and banana leaves as a way to cope with his deteriorating health. Meanwhile, Shane trains to become a Buddhist monk, in an effort to build karma for Pitch… to either keep him alive or to help him along in his afterlife. A remarkably beautiful, spiritual film from Thai director Anucha Boonyawatana (the same director behind the films The Blue Hour and Down the River), Malila: The Farewell Flower is as close to transcendent as cinema gets.

This Weekend’s VOD Favorites

The Gay Cinema Video On Demand experience at TLAgay.com has your entertainment needs covered! We’re always working to expand selection of new and old gay-themed movies available for your viewing pleasure. Here’s just five of our current favorites, from various years, that you may have missed – ALL available to watch INSTANTLY! These aren’t our TOP 5, by any means – just a handful of flicks we want to highlight.

You’ll Never Be Alone
Introverted Juan (Sergio Hernandez), manager of a mannequin factory, lives alone with his eighteen-year-old gay son, Pablo (Andrew Bargsted). While Pablo blithely studies dance, Juan is hoping that, after twenty-five years at the firm, his boss will consider him for a partnership. When Pablo is badly wounded in a brutal homophobic attack, which sees him hospitalized, his father realizes just how far they have become estranged. A lack of witnesses and expensive medical bills force Juan to leave the quiet stability of his life for good and reposition himself in a world where there is discrimination. Time and again, his efforts amount to nothing… until one night on the streets of Santiago when he decides to start making up his own rules in order to save his son.

Doors Cut Down
Guillermo (Israel Rodriguez) seems like your average high school student, but he’s hiding a naughty little secret. In private, he has become a suave expert at cruising his local shopping mall for gay sex. Always looking for a new trick, he even resorts to seducing his much older English tutor. When he finally meets the hottest guy he’s ever seen, a man who may mean more to him than just a hot fuck, Guillermo finds himself suddenly conflicted. Newly restored in High Definition, this sexy 18-minute Spanish comedy is back to thrill audiences once again! A massive hit on the LGBT film festival circuit at the time of its release – the year 2000, to be specific – Doors Cut Down caused quite a controversy due to its frank and graphic depiction of a young man’s sexual exploration. It has become something of a notorious gay cinema classic.

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