Director Christophe Honoré talks Sorry Angel

Paris, 1993. Jacques (Pierre Deladonchamps) is a semi-renowned writer and single father in his thirties trying to maintain his sense of romance and humor in spite of the turmoil in his life and the world. While on a work trip to Brittany, he meets Arthur (Vincent Lacoste), an aspiring filmmaker in his early twenties, who is experiencing a sexual awakening and eager to get out of his parochial life. Arthur becomes instantly smitten with the older man.

From acclaimed writer-director Christophe Honoré (Love Songs, Dans Paris) comes Sorry Angel, a mature and deeply emotional reflection on love and loss, and youth and aging. In its intergenerational snapshot of cruising, courtship and casual sex – Jacques’ forty-something neighbor Mathieu (Denis Podalydès) rounds out the triumvirate – Sorry Angel balances hope for the future with agony over the past in an unforgettable drama about finding the courage to love in the moment.

Read what director Christophe Honoré has to say about Sorry Angel below and click here to pre-order your copy. It’s coming to DVD in May.

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Now Available On-Demand: Popporn

Popporn is a comedic series where comedians roast gay porn scenes. What’s weird, what’s strange, what’s hilarious, what’s gross, what’s surprising, what’s enticing? Nothing will escape their comedic wrath!

Reminiscent of comedic commentary shows like Best Week Ever and the plethora of “I Love the… (insert decade here)” installments produced by VH1, Popporn has their talking heads cover a wide variety of porn topics. They dig into sexed-up film parodies, people with daddy issues, Game of Thrones-inspired fantasies, straight first timers and much, much more.

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Trailer Alert: Seeds

Young Andy (Emilio Puente) is having a hard time at school, taunted for being different than the other boys. When his mother unexpectedly dies, Andy moves to a small Mexican suburb to live with his strict, no-nonsense grandmother (played by frequent Pedro Almodovar collaborator Carmen Maura).

Soon, Andy finds comfort and refuge in Charly (Diego Alvarez Garcia), the estate’s sexy young gardener, who introduces him to an exciting world of danger, risk, and temptation. In this epic coming-of-age story, Andy will navigate the pain and joy that comes with grief, growing up, and finding your identity.

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Coming Soon: Sorry Angel

Paris, 1993. Jacques (Pierre Deladonchamps) is a semi-renowned writer and single father in his thirties trying to maintain his sense of romance and humor in spite of the turmoil in his life and the world. While on a work trip to Brittany, he meets Arthur (Vincent Lacoste), an aspiring filmmaker in his early twenties, who is experiencing a sexual awakening and eager to get out of his parochial life. Arthur becomes instantly smitten with the older man.

From acclaimed writer-director Christophe Honoré (Love Songs, Dans Paris) comes Sorry Angel, a mature and deeply emotional reflection on love and loss, and youth and aging. In its intergenerational snapshot of cruising, courtship and casual sex – Jacques’ forty-something neighbor Mathieu (Denis Podalydès) rounds out the triumvirate – Sorry Angel balances hope for the future with agony over the past in an unforgettable drama about finding the courage to love in the moment.

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The Gospel of Eureka deserves to be praised

Narrated by Shortbus and Can You Ever Forgive Me? star Mx Justin Vivian Bond, the explosive new documentary The Gospel of Eureka witnesses as love, faith and civil rights collide in a southern town – where evangelical Christians and drag queens step into the spotlight to dismantle stereotypes.

Taking a personal, and often comical look at negotiating differences between religion and belief through performance, political action, and partnership, gospel drag shows and passion plays set the stage for one hell of a show.

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Now Available On-Demand: He Loves Me

Director Konstantinos Menelaou‘s sexually explicit new relationship drama He Loves Me is an exploration of the unconventional nature of love and its ability to survive against the fear of loneliness, psychological traumas and the problems that come with life in the big city.

The collapsing relationship shared by two men finds an outlet for escape on an isolated beach. Once there, they feel free to expose their deepest emotions. Their wounded relationship might not survive the vacation, but it’s certainly a glorious place to feel things out.

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Naples in Veils isn’t actually a gay-themed movie, but we still think it’s worth a look

Though it concerns a straight love affair (and an ensuing murder mystery), this new film from maverick queer director Ferzan Ozpetek (Saturn in Opposition, His Secret Life, Steam: The Turkish Bath) has a subtle gay sensibility we think you will appreciate. (Also, there’s a lot of tasteful, lovingly rendered male nudity from scrumptious leading man Alessandro Borghi!)

During a party, Adriana (Giovanna Mezzogiorno) crosses the seductive and powerful look of Andrea (Borghi), a charming and self-confident young man. They are immediately attracted to each other and spend a passionate night together. Adriana begins to think this could be the beginning of a great love that could change her life. They agree to meet the next day, but Andrea doesn’t show up.

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Photo Gallery: Devil’s Path

Set in the early 1990s, the new gay thriller Devil’s Path follows Noah
(Stephen Twardokus) who, while searching for his missing brother in a remote gay cruising park, sets his sights on a handsome stranger (JD Scalzo).

When Noah is viciously attacked, he and his new companion escape through the woods with two menacing thugs in hot pursuit. Lost and frightened, they begin to turn on each other and slowly unravel the truth of what’s really going on around them.

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Tickled is an edge-of-your-seat documentary

“I’ve come across a lot of strange things and interesting people in my years as a pop culture reporter, but nothing had prepared me for what I encountered during the making of Tickled.”co-director David Farrier

After stumbling upon a bizarre “competitive endurance tickling” video online, wherein young men are paid to be tied up and tickled, reporter David Farrier reaches out to request a story from the company. But the reply he receives is shocking – the sender mocks Farrier’s sexual orientation and threatens extreme legal action should he dig any deeper. So, like any good journalist confronted by a bully, he does just the opposite: he travels to the hidden tickling facilities in Los Angeles and uncovers a vast empire, known for harassing and harming the lives of those who protest their involvement in these films. The more he investigates, the stranger it gets, discovering secret identities and criminal activity.

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Coming Soon: Pinsky

Sophia Pinsky (Rebecca Karpovsky) seems like a functioning adult. But when she loses her girlfriend and her grandfather in the same day and moves back in with her authoritarian Russian grandmother, Marina (Larisa Popova), everything she thought she’d escaped is waiting to welcome her back with open arms.

Thrilled to have Sophia under her influence again, and obsessed with finding her a proper (male) partner, Marina conspires to marry her off to Trevor (Jacob Brandt), a nice Jewish boy Sophia has known since they were in diapers. After the date with him is a dud, Sophia finds her way to a weekly open mic night, where on a whim she gets on stage and discovers there’s actually an audience for her Queer-Russian-Jewish-American sense of humor.

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